Be Brave! The sum of the parts is greater than the whole!

When you are looking to make a step change in your career – be brave.

Ultimately, it’s up to you to make it happen.

I’m writing this piece to demonstrate that it is possible to leverage your transferable skills and build a career you love.

At the age of 27 I was fortunate to join an amazing company – KRTA, which went on to merge with Morrison Cooper to become Kingston Morrison, then SKM.

I was blessed with impressive leaders and a company with a great history, with even better to come.

And importantly, I was given license to push the boundaries in Computer Aided Design.

I learnt a lot and so did my colleagues!

From there I moved my career forward across multiple sectors using my transferable skills – from Engineering to Technology to Job Boards to Cloud Education Software (early days for cloud!) and then Recruitment.

Some ‘jobs’ were better than others!

6 years ago I made the choice to resign my role with a corporate. I didn’t hate the job. But I knew that I might if I stayed.

I founded MyCareerBrand.net

greenbannerIt was a brave move. The planet is full of ‘Career Coaches’ so I knew I had to offer something different.

And for the past 6 years I’ve been fortunate enough to help others to move their careers forward through properly defined job search strategies and go to market collateral such as CV’s, LinkedIn profiles and interview skills that collectively demonstrate the ‘why you should interview me, and then hire me!

When I set out I didn’t think I’d be providing Job Search Strategy coaching services outside of Auckland – let alone outside of New Zealand.

Clearly my context wasn’t big enough. Because today I am coaching in over 10 countries around the world and loving every minute of it.

I’m glad I didn’t cling to that ‘job’ until it became a ‘JOB’.

My mum once said during an interview with a reporter discussing her career and retirement at the age of 73. “I never went to ‘work’ a day in my life. I built a career around my passion”.

This video really spells it out.

Think about your career and how you could move it forward by leveraging your transferable skills.

The sum of the parts is very much greater than the whole!

About Craig

Craig provides Job Search Strategy coaching including Curriculum Vitae (CV), LinkedIn Profiling and Career Transition/Outplacement services.

His focus is to assist those seeking a new role to develop their value proposition, marketing collateral, interview skills and to achieve the best possible outcome.

He is recognised for his ability to develop his clients’ capability and confidence to communicate their skills and enable them to sell their value proposition in to prospective employers and recruitment consultants.

Craig draws on over 20 years of leadership experience within various sectors including HR, Recruitment, Professional Services, Financial Services, and Technology, supported by a strong background in sales and marketing.

Craig’s clients span over 8 countries around the world – face to face coaching in Auckland, New Zealand and coaching via Webinars and Skype – including New Zealand, Australia, Asia Pac, UAE, Singapore, Malaysia, North America and the UK. His job search strategy articles are read in over 130 countries.

Follow Craig McAlpine and MyCareerBrand.net:

Twitter: @MyCareerBrand#MyCareerBrand

Website: www.mycareerbrand.net

Facebook: www.facebook.com/MyCareerBrand.net

Blog: http://mycareerbrand.net/blog.html

LinkedIn:

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Posted in Career, Career Transition, Personal Brand, Skills

Job Search Strategy: Weekly Roundup 9.6.2017

Wow – this has been an interesting week!

I’ve had some amazing feedback from clients around how developing a clear value proposition and being able to articulate that in the form of their CV, LinkedIn profile and their interviews has played a significant role in them winning new opportunities to advance their career.

On the other hand – and not so great was some feedback from one of my clients who is looking to exit their organisation. They are quite up front with their manager that they are looking to advance their career outside of their current organisation. So it’s all on the table. But – wait for it, when my client told his manager he was getting some coaching around job search strategy his manager said…

“what a completed waste of time. People just apply for jobs. They don’t need to bother with that stuff.”

Now I know I’m biased and you know i believe in preparation. Actually having an executable strategy and well thought through tactics to secure a new role – but how many out there lose out on opportunities simply because they take the transactional approach his manager was suggesting?

I guess it’s your choice as to how you go about acquiring a new role.

I’ve collected a sample of my LinkedIn posts for the week for you to reflect on. Most of what I post is inspired by discussions I have with my clients or their experiences and challenges in what is becoming a much more sophisticated candidate market.

Here’s the weekly roundup…

Achievements.

When you’re writing your CV, preparing for interviews and reflecting on your achievements think beyond the ‘what you did’ and the ‘how you did it’. Talk to the benefits of the what and how.

e.g “Implemented an enterprise wide CRM” is not an achievement in itself. It’s what you did, and was probably your job. Simply demonstrating you’ve done your job is not going to wow the reader.

Exceeding expectations and outlining the value of the delivery is.

e.g. “Enabled sales and revenue capture (+15%) and pipeline reporting through implementing an enterprise wide CRM”.

The latter example demonstrates the benefit and an understanding of why you did it.

And this post I shared – well worth a read…

8 Things Ridiculously Successful People Do Before 8 AM

 

Engaging with Search Consultants? Preparation is key!

Have you prepared sufficiently before you start to engage with Search Consultants?

Operating at a senior level they search for, and place candidates in $250k+ jobs.

Before you make an appointment and/or meet, create a one page cover letter broken into 4 sections.

1) You; Your previous/current role.

2) Your key strengths/what you bring to the table.

3) What you’re looking for.

4) Call to action/follow through. Make sure your Linkedin profile is optimised and communicates a strong value proposition.

Preparation is key!

 

I love to share…

so I can help others. And there’s some great articles on LinkedIn that you could share too. If you found the article interesting – others may do too!

Take time to share other people’s (or organisation.s) posts. Heres one from LinkedIn  you should take a look at. But – you can also add value by contributing your subject matter expertise as I do. Watch your profile views start to soar!

Here’s my take on one LinkedIn article:

LinkedIn’s online Job applications have what they’re calling ‘Easy Apply’. The ‘easy’ thing for you to do is to just click the button. The smart thing to do is not to! Well not until you’ve researched the role, the company, the hiring manager’s challenges etc and ensured your tactics and capability will match their needs. The below link will take you to the LinkedIn blog that’s selling the Easy Apply option. Use it, but use it wisely.

Click here for the LinkedIn article I commented on

Please don’t sabotage your opportunity by hitting the Easy Apply button as if it were simply a transactional numbers game. 

 

Well I’m off on a holiday for two weeks. I’ll probably still be posting on LinkedIn.

Have a great week. And if you are thinking of looking for a new job, remember – preparation is key. Ask questions. Be curious. Back yourself!

And, if you need to – change what you’re doing!

“if you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got!”

About Craig

Craig provides Job Search Strategy coaching including Curriculum Vitae (CV), LinkedIn Profiling and Career Transition/Outplacement services.

His focus is to assist those seeking a new role to develop their value proposition, marketing collateral, interview skills and to achieve the best possible outcome.

He is recognised for his ability to develop his clients’ capability and confidence to communicate their skills and enable them to sell their value proposition in to prospective employers and recruitment consultants.

Craig draws on over 20 years of leadership experience within various sectors including HR, Recruitment, Professional Services, Financial Services, and Technology, supported by a strong background in sales and marketing.

Craig’s clients span over 9 countries around the world – face to face coaching in Auckland, New Zealand and coaching via Webinars and Skype – including New Zealand, Australia, Asia Pac, UAE, Singapore, Malaysia, North America and the UK. His job search strategy articles are read in over 130 countries.

Follow Craig McAlpine and MyCareerBrand.net:

Twitter: @MyCareerBrand#MyCareerBrand

Website: www.mycareerbrand.net

Facebook: www.facebook.com/MyCareerBrand.net

Blog: http://mycareerbrand.net/blog.html

LinkedIn:

 

 

 

Posted in Applying For a Role, Curriculum Vitae, CV, Interview Skills, LinkedIn, Networking, Personal Brand

Job Search Strategy: Weekly Roundup 2.6.17

Welcome to the first MyCareerBrand.net Job Search Strategy ‘Weekly Roundup’.

You may have seen I’ve been busy on LinkedIn lately publishing what I call the #DailySnippet. These short LinkedIn posts are intended to act as a catalyst to keep you on track with your Job Search Strategy.

In these posts you’ll see I use hashtags (#) a lot. I do this to make it easier for you to search on LinkedIn for specific content.

The hash tag handles are generally:

  • #MyCareerBrand
  • #JobSearchStrategy
  • #YourChoice
  • #InterviewSkills
  • #Job

Look out for them each day by doing a search on LinkedIn using those hash tag handles. Or you might just see them in your LinkedIn home page feed.

The #MyCareerBrand is the catch all.

I use #YourChoice because – actually, it is literally your choice as to how you approach the market for a new job. You can do it strategically or like most – transitionally by simply hitting the ‘APPLY NOW’ button as many times as you can. It’s about numbers. A job’s bound to land in your lap soon, right? Wrong!

So – here are my LinkedIn #DailySnippets for the week ending 2.6.17

Simply ‘connecting’ with a person on LinkedIn wont build a relationship!

Photo on 2017-05-23 at 20:49.pngSomeone I’d never met before sent me a generic request to connect.

Whilst not smart it’s not unusual.

When I asked why, their response was a one liner “build our relationship”.

Next message; “I want a job”.

Really?

Folks, if you’re going to connect with someone you don’t know – don’t sabotage the opportunity.

There’s a thing called ‘Add a note’! Whilst I was polite in my own response I wondered at the level this person operates at when applying for a #job. Having a guess, I’d say they simply hit the ‘APPLY NOW’ button and wonder why they can’t get an #interview!

Hence they’re still looking for a job. Are you?

 

We keep reading it. “Jobs to go at…”

Photo on 2017-05-26 at 04:58.pngThe word often used is, “redundant!”

Whilst this may seem of little comfort right now, it’s the job that’s redundant. Not you.

If your skills and experience remain relevant to other employers it’s not the end of your career.

It may be a warning shot across your bows though. And yes, it’s unsettling.

Look for industry trends. Is there a trend? Think strategically – like an effective business leader.

Remember, your job is a business. How you evolve your offering, skills, present your capability and value proposition matters.

Are your #CV, #LinkedIn profile and #interview skills doing this for you?

 

 

Are you being found? And when you are – can you close the deal?

It’s be a real shame for them and you if you didn’t meet!

Absolutely!

Now, the challenge is for you to articulate to the market what you have to offer – in a way that that someone will hear you and recognise it is you they have to hire.

Can you?

 

 

 

 

The Counter Offer: What will you do?

The red carpet isn’t all it’s cracked up to be!

You’ve been offered a new #job.

 

The prospect seems exciting.

What will you do when your current #employer counter offers?

Your Job Search Strategy plan should incorporate a process flow for guidance.

Ensure you have not only thought about your stance – but actually have it mapped out.

Have you?

 

 

 

Building brand awareness through sharing with a thought makes a difference!

SPhoto on 2017-05-30 at 06:37.pngharing an Article or Post on #LinkedIn among your team is a great way to pass on useful information and build your own personal brand.

You’d usually do this by selecting ‘Like’ or ‘Share’.

When you include your own synopsis or view you build even more awareness.

You don’t have to do that just on LinkedIn though – where the chance of your team seeing your ‘like’ or ‘share’ could be minimal (especially if they have lots of connections).

Use the 3 dot button (top right of your screen) and select ‘Share Via’ to send an internal or external group email.

Or include a link on your intranet blog.

Share and comment with a Post or Article today.

 

 

 

Struggling to find opportunities? Can’t make the job search call?

Photo on 2017-05-31 at 06:40.jpgIf you’re struggling to set up meetings, call people in your network, or worse – people you’ve never met, it’s Call Reluctance.

A good indicator is when you repeatedly say to yourself;

“I’ll call ….. to set up a coffee meeting”.

And, it never happens! 😱

Mostly attributed to sales people, it’s also something #job seekers face too.

But, when you’re looking for a job you’re in ‘solution selling’ mode. And no calls means no sales! (Read no job!)

👏🏼So let’s fix it!

Create a Call Plan.

A simple schedule will include at least these things – but there are more.

  1. Who
  2. What
  3. When
  4. Outcome

Stick to the plan.

Distractions getting in the way?

Commit to someone. They’re your ‘Sales Manager’.

 

Are you interviewing for a Job? Stop ‘talking’!

Photo on 2017-06-01 at 07:32.jpgHave you ever played back your practice interview? (Assuming you have practiced!)

If you haven’t, you absolutely should.

Using a seasoned interviewer, test your interview skills against set criteria.

Replay the video.

How are you coming across?

Reflect back on the body language of the interviewer.

Are the interviewers eyes glazing over

Are you catching a glimpse of a stifled yawn?

What aspects did you perform well on.

Where could you have done better?

If you think you know your CV backwards – well that’s a start. But it isn’t near enough to get you across the line!

 

Tenure? Get the heck over it!

Photo on 2017-06-01 at 18:51.jpgActually, you should be all over it!

Communicate.

A hiring manager said to me yesterday; “I wasn’t that impressed with his CV.”

When I asked why, she said “he seemed to have changed jobs a lot!”

I asked how often. She said “oh, about every 2 years”

She couldn’t get past tenure.

Whilst we live in a world of change, project based portfolio jobs, restructures etc. think about what will make your CV impress the reader – no matter how long or short your tenure.

What outcomes have you delivered?

While she wasn’t impressed – and actually I wondered how much talent she’d lost through that little piece of bias, another hiring manager was and his CV and interview skills won him the job!

 

Presenting to win your next job.

Google exec presentationYou’ve made it through goodness knows how many interviews and now you’ve been asked to do a presentation as part of the selection process.

The weekend is here – you’ve got 2 days to pull it together. You may be freaking out right now.

Worse – you could be heading towards a visual nightmare!

You need to hook your audience and, when you do your content and style need to resonate ahead of your competitor candidates.

Make sure it’s memorable for the right reasons.

Graphics with only a few key words increases the chances of your story gaining cut through.

A slide full of bullet points and words wont.

Overlaying this is your own style, body language and tone. Read this story and please take the time to watch the video.

The video especially has some great tips.

Do your research about the audience and their key issues, and review/create the framework for your presentation.

You may wish to do a ‘dry run’ with someone who will take an objective view.

Make sure you provide them with adequate background (ref the video for content around this) 

About Craig

Craig provides Job Search Strategy coaching including Curriculum Vitae (CV), LinkedIn Profiling and Career Transition/Outplacement services.

His focus is to assist those seeking a new role to develop their value proposition, marketing collateral, interview skills and to achieve the best possible outcome.

He is recognised for his ability to develop his clients’ capability and confidence to communicate their skills and enable them to sell their value proposition in to prospective employers and recruitment consultants.

Craig draws on over 20 years of leadership experience within various sectors including HR, Recruitment, Professional Services, Financial Services, and Technology, supported by a strong background in sales and marketing.

Craig’s clients span over 8 countries around the world – face to face coaching in Auckland, New Zealand and coaching via Webinars and Skype – including New Zealand, Australia, Asia Pac, UAE, Singapore, Malaysia, North America and the UK. His job search strategy articles are read in over 130 countries.

Follow Craig McAlpine and MyCareerBrand.net:

Twitter: @MyCareerBrand#MyCareerBrand

Website: www.mycareerbrand.net

Facebook: www.facebook.com/MyCareerBrand.net

Blog: http://mycareerbrand.net/blog.html

LinkedIn:

 

Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Applying For a Role, Career, Communications, Curriculum Vitae, CV, Interview Skills, jobs, Personal Brand, Recruitment, Skills

Why securing a new role is getting tougher

A significant part of why job seekers are finding it tougher to secure a new #job in New Zealand is this:

“The United Kingdom comprises the largest group of visitors planning to work here on nearly 7000, followed by France, Germany and Australia.” 

This article in the New Zealand Herald today provides a significant insight into the reasons why there are real challenges for those who are seeking to secure employment or indeed a new role here in New Zealand. Particularly those who may have found it easier a few years ago.

Migrant graphic

It aint what it used to be!

Earlier this week one of my ‘mid career’ clients said to me;

“…I used to be able to just get a new job when I wanted one, but it seems to be tougher this time. Before, the roles would come my way – but this time I don’t seem to be getting the interviews that I used to…”

When I looked at their CV and listened to their pitch, I understood why.

My client is now competing in a radically different job acquisition arena compared to where they were 3 years ago – against candidates who are not only hungry and as technically qualified for the same role – but who often bring more and are prepared to take the job for less.

Sure, these skilled migrants may not have the local knowledge but they bring an attitude that takes nothing for granted.

They don’t simply land on their feet. Those migrants who are successful in securing a new role have invested the time and the effort to understand what New Zealand employers and recruiters want to see in a CV, what they need to do to not only secure an interview, but where their value proposition and interview skills need to be in order to win the role over a ‘local’ with local knowledge and local experience.

As a job search and acquisition strategist I’m seeing more and more people coming to me – migrants and ‘kiwi’s’, who realise that simply pushing the ‘APPLY NOW’ button on a job ad isn’t going to position them to be successful in securing a new role. Candidates are starting to get more savvy.

So if as a ‘local’ you’re not refreshing your approach to securing a new role – chances are you’re going to be way behind those who have.

You can continue to do what you did 3 or more years ago, but you’ll fail more often. The landscape has changed dramatically, not only with the competition for jobs significantly increasing and successful candidates investing more time up front before they hit the market, but also in the way hiring managers and recruiters are sourcing, processing and securing talent.

Don’t hit the APPLY NOW button without knowing you’re prepared and have done all you can to position yourself to win.

#YourChoice #JobSearchStrategy #MyCareerBrand #Employment

About Craig

Craig is a Job Search Strategist.

He provides tailored Career Coaching, Curriculum Vitae (CV), LinkedIn Profiling and Career Transition/Outplacement services. His focus is to assist those seeking a new role to develop their marketing collateral, interview skills and to achieve the best possible outcome.

He is recognised for his ability to develop his clients’ communication skills to enable them to sell their value proposition to employers and recruitment consultants, increasing their confidence and their ability to back themselves.

Craig draws on over 20 years of leadership experience within various sectors including HR, Recruitment, Professional Services, Financial Services, and Technology, supported by a strong background in sales and marketing.

Craig’s clients span New Zealand, Australia, Asia Pac, UAE and across to the UK, with his job search strategy articles read in over 130 countries.

Follow Craig McAlpine and MyCareerBrand.net:

Twitter:@MyCareerBrand#MyCareerBrand

Website:www.mycareerbrand.net

Facebook:www.facebook.com/MyCareerBrand.net

Blog:http://mycareerbrand.net/blog.html

LinkedIn:

Posted in Applying For a Role, Career Transition, Curriculum Vitae, CV, Interview Skills, jobs, Recruitment

The power of a few positive words

Sometimes it’s the simple things that make a positive contribution to someones life.

The ripple effect can be huge.

It can be listening – without judging.

It can be as simple as a hand on the shoulder – no words, just to let that person know you’re there for them.

It can be a few carefully chosen words in support that they can reflect on.

It can be passing on feedback to someone who you know made a real difference too.

I had some amazing feedback on Sunday that I’d like to share, because I think we’re all capable of making a difference. All of us.

The conversation went something like this…

But first some background:

The back story:

A friend of mine placed a message on Facebook last year – rather sad, saying their role had been disestablished. They’d been with the organisation for quite a few years. The news rocked them. They didn’t see it coming.

I saw their Facebook post and went back to them asking if they’d been offered an Outplacement or Career Transition Programme by their employer. They hadn’t. I knew their employer had offered such a service to other employees in the past. So I suggested they follow up and ask their manager and HR if they would be prepared to provide such a programme. They did, and the results are spelt out below.

Have a read, it’s our dialogue. And this is why I believe it’s the simple things that can make a positive contribution to someones life.

The conversation…

Them…

“…I just wanted to thank you; when I lost my job and posted about it you asked if [my company] offered “outplacement services”. I had no idea what they were but, as you’d mentioned it, I did ask and lo and behold they did. To cut a long story short this turned out to be very very useful, the person I got (From [the outplacement company]) was great and was instrumental in getting me back on my feet . So, although you merely asked a question, you really helped me, so thank you 🙂”

Me…

That’s really nice of you to say that. Can I pass this on to [the outplacement company]?

I’m pleased [the outplacement company] were able to assist you. Can I ask who your coach was?

Them…

“More than happy for you to pass on to [the outplacement company], it was [the coach] who helped me.

Cheers 🙂”

Now, the reality is I simply asked a question. They had to follow through. It was their employer who said “yes”. It was their coach that delivered a great experience.

The person went on to secure a new role. But just as important – they regained their confidence and self belief.

It took just a bit of thought and a few words.

So if you hear of someone who is faced with a forced change of employment, reach out. You may make a difference.

About Craig

Craig provides tailored Career Coaching, Curriculum Vitae (CV), LinkedIn Profiling and Career Transition/Outplacement services. His focus is to assist those seeking a new role to develop their marketing collateral, interview skills and to achieve the best possible outcome.

He is recognised for his ability to develop his clients’ communication skills to enable them to sell their value proposition to employers and recruitment consultants, increasing their confidence and their ability to back themselves.

Craig draws on over 20 years of leadership experience within various sectors including HR, Recruitment, Professional Services, Financial Services, and Technology, supported by a strong background in sales and marketing.

Craig’s clients span New Zealand, Australia, Asia Pac, UAE and across to the UK, with his job search strategy articles read in over 130 countries.

Follow Craig McAlpine and MyCareerBrand.net:

Twitter: @MyCareerBrand#MyCareerBrand

Website: www.mycareerbrand.net

Facebook: www.facebook.com/MyCareerBrand.net

Blog: http://mycareerbrand.net/blog.html

LinkedIn:

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in Career Transition, Networking

When do I ask about remuneration?

I’ve read a number of posts that go some way towards addressing the question of when to ask “how much is the role paying?”

Actually, it’s not that simple, and if you address it as such – you’re setting yourself up for a career of below par earnings.

So this post is longer than I would normally write – because there is so much at stake in this area for you, and there’s a process to follow if you want to get it right.

Get through it because it could be worth many, many more $ to you as you progress your career.

I’d just like to say at this point that I recognise it’s not always about the money – so keep that in mind too. But you do need to approach the rem part of the equation well informed and cognisant of what matters most to you.

 

Here are 5 key gateways you should test and pass before asking the question about remuneration and progressing to negotiation.

Be prepared

 This is the order…

1. Know your market

Employees coming out of an organisation with medium to long term tenures of  3+ years, often fall behind in remuneration. They’ve had promotions and increased responsibilities, yet their remuneration has only just kept pace with inflation, and certainly not with their skillset or the value they’re bringing to the table.

Why is this?

Because they’re not ‘in the market’ they don’t necessarily know the market. They’re just not aware of where their remuneration should be sitting. So they take it for granted that their current employer will pay fair market rates. Not always true.

Securing a new role with a new company may be the best opportunity you have to ramp up your remuneration to a level that’s appropriate for your expertise and the value you deliver.

Read these articles about why moving companies may increase your remuneration ahead of those that dont.

https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/02/job-switchers-raise/460044/

https://www.forbes.com/sites/cameronkeng/2014/06/22/employees-that-stay-in-companies-longer-than-2-years-get-paid-50-less/#3f92436e07fa

 

 2. Understand two things:

  • your value proposition and
  • your market value.

In addition to knowing the market and to gain an understanding of your positioning and the level of expertise you’re providing in your role category, you need to work through your achievements and the value you have delivered . Write down your value proposition.

Research is key!

Find out more; Prepare a brief positioning statement which will succinctly articulate to various recruiters and hiring managers who may be prepared to share with you the likely salary banding for roles at the level and industry sectors you’re targeting.

Remember there’s an opportunity to secure more through the 20% to 30% stretch!

Click here to read more about securing a stretch assignment or role.

 

Research various websites for advice on remuneration:

http://nz.hudson.com/salary-hub/salary-guides

https://www.hays.net.nz/HaysSalaryGuide/index.htm

https://www.roberthalf.co.nz/resources/salary-guide

http://www.trademe.co.nz/jobs/salary-guide

http://www.payscale.com/research/NZ/Country=New_Zealand/Salary

https://www.seek.co.nz/career-advice/understanding-how-salaries-are-calculated

 

3a. The “what’s your current salary” question:

It’s inevitable right? The same old question from the recruiter or hiring manager.

“What’s your current salary?”

This can often be before they’ve asked you about the role you’re currently in and the results you’ve delivered.

It’s a really crazy and lazy question, and a red flag to you that they’re pigeon holing you.

Actually, what you’re on now may only be an indication of what you started on in your current role, the preparedness of the company to pay, and how well you haven’t managed to negotiate with your current employer your value to the business. (Ref point 1 above)

Your current remuneration is not necessarily an indicator of where you deserve to be in terms of your ‘market value’. 

Think about this… The question a recruiter or hiring manager should ask is; “In less than one minute, tell me about the role you’re in, your core deliverables and the benefits you’ve delivered to the business?”

And then; “What’s your next role?”

And then; “What sort of organisation, size and sector, do you see yourself working in?”

And then; “What’re your expectations around remuneration?”

They can then make a judgement on whether you’re being realistic in terms of the market and your target. Your ability to articulate your value will determine their view. So know your value proposition, your next role, the type of organisation and your fair market value.

3b. When the recruiter asks you the ‘same old question’ answer it with;

“my current salary is based on the expertise I had when they hired me ‘X’ years ago plus some incremental inflation adjustments. Since then I’ve grown my responsibilities and the value of the deliverables. Whilst I’m currently on $X (plus an at risk of $Y) in my next role as ……. I’m seeking a salary of $Z”.

Get it in!

If you haven’t positioned yourself they may ask you; “tell me why you think you’re worth that salary?”

If you know your value proposition and you’ve done your research (ref point 1) you will be able to articulate why you’re worth what you say you are, back it up with data and speak with confidence – not arrogance or ignorance.

Back yourself!

4. What’s the question to ask?

 

Actually – this part is the simple part. As long as you’re prepared – and not scared, just have the confidence and awareness of timing.

After you’ve provided your positioning background to the recruiter and/or hiring manager so that they understand your value, and they’ve provided more detail about the role, it’s challenges and opportunities – assuming you want to progress, you can ask the following question.

“From what you’ve told me about the role so far, I’m very interested to progress. I understand that this question may be asked later on in the process, but because I value your time and my own, can you share with me the ‘banding’ for this role.”

Here’s more information about banding:

https://www.cornerstoneondemand.com/glossary/salary-banding

5. When do I ask?

It’s not about you being greedy or moving too fast.

It’s all about timing and being efficient with the process.

Why is it that some recruiters jump straight to “what is your current remuneration?”

Actually – as transactional and flawed as that question is, they’re trying to save themselves (and maybe you) time. It may not necessarily be the best approach – but it is what it is.

And the result is that unless you explain it as I’ve stated above (ref 3b) and have clearly articulated your value proposition, they may come back at you with “well this role is only paying $X”. Then where do you go? Lower your expectations?

Heck no!

Because you know your value you should be able to get around this. If they’re non-negotiable, then you could choose to walk away. Be confident that you’ve made the right decision.

You can only do this by knowing what you’re worth.

When do you ask?

Ask early!

Be prepared

Not scared

 

 

 

About Craig

Craig is a Job Search Strategist.

He provides tailored Career Coaching, Curriculum Vitae (CV), LinkedIn Profiling and Career Transition/Outplacement services. His focus is to assist those seeking a new role to develop their marketing collateral, interview skills and to achieve the best possible outcome.

He is recognised for his ability to develop his clients’ communication skills to enable them to sell their value proposition to employers and recruitment consultants, increasing their confidence and their ability to back themselves.

Craig draws on over 20 years of leadership experience within various sectors including HR, Recruitment, Professional Services, Financial Services, and Technology, supported by a strong background in sales and marketing.

Craig’s clients span New Zealand, Australia, Asia Pac, UAE and across to the UK, with his job search strategy articles read in over 130 countries.

Follow Craig McAlpine and MyCareerBrand.net:

Twitter:@MyCareerBrand#MyCareerBrand

Website:www.mycareerbrand.net

Facebook:www.facebook.com/MyCareerBrand.net

Blog:http://mycareerbrand.net/blog.html

LinkedIn:

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Applying For a Role, Personal Brand

What do employers want from Career Transition providers?

When I look at the choice of providers for Career Transition/Outplacement services the market appears to be crowded – and ranges from large global providers down to single operator coaches. However, irrespective of size most seem to communicate a similar offering with the only key differences being the coaches, the e-platform/portal, collateral and/or delivery options (online, telephone, self service or full service face to face).

Most seem to be employer centric in their value proposition (outcomes).

Scroll down to participate in the poll and see the results so far.

Over the last 5 years I’ve seen employers – some of them quite large (banks, telco’s and government), either significantly reducing or abandoning the Career Transition services offered to their employees. In addition I’ve seen providers margins being squeezed to the point that it’s become more and more difficult to offer the full service option previously expected (a little similar to outsourced recruitment) and replaced with online and telephone support.

Where-as 5 years ago webinars, scaled back self service portals and telephone support were frowned upon by employers it’s now starting to become the norm. Whilst face-to-face is undoubtably the preferred option for employees the selection by employers of the online channel is to some degree understandable. Online self service portals have become more sophisticated and offer way more functionality than they did 5 years ago. Employee access to the internet from home is also now more ubiquitous – further increasing the viability of online and video linked Skype and webinar based programmes.

So what are the qualitative measures and selection criteria employers are using? Are employers looking for demonstrated employee outcomes based services? Or is Career Transition becoming a ‘be seen to be doing the right thing’ option.

What do employers look for from Career Transition providers?

I’d like to find out and would appreciate it if you are an employer and/or decision maker around Career Transition services for your employees taking the time to answer and comment on the below survey.

Note: The survey is anonymous.

About Craig:

Craig provides tailored Career Coaching, Curriculum Vitae (CV), LinkedIn Profiling and Career Transition/Outplacement services. His focus is to develop his clients marketing collateral and interview skills to achieve the best possible outcome.

He is recognised for his ability to develop his clients’ communication skills to enable them to sell their value proposition to employers and recruitment consultants, increasing their confidence and ability to back themselves, ultimately winning more employment opportunities and more importantly – selecting the right one.

Craig draws on over 20 years of leadership experience within various sectors including HR, Recruitment, Professional Services, Financial Services, and Technology, supported by a strong background in sales and marketing.

Craig’s clients span from New Zealand, Australia, UAE and across to the UK, with his career advice articles read in over 130 countries.

Follow Craig McAlpine and MyCareerBrand.net:

Twitter: @MyCareerBrand #MyCareerBrand

Website: www.mycareerbrand.net

Facebook: www.facebook.com/MyCareerBrand.net

Blog: http://mycareerbrand.net/blog.html

LinkedIn:

 

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Career, Career Transition, Outplacement

5 key steps to negotiate the best job offer

A call from a prospective employer or recruiter offering you ‘the dream job’ may come from out of the blue.

Or if you’re actively job hunting you may be working through the recruitment process.

Either way – in order to make the right decision – and one you feel comfortable with, it’s best to be well prepared, informed and confident enough to back yourself to negotiate a great outcome.

The alternative is to get stuck in a rut or make the wrong decision because of various influences – such as partner pressure, emotions, ego, desperation – and not to be ignored, the recruiter or hiring manager’s hard sell.

One of the most common themes coming through for candidates during the negotiation and acceptance or decline process is the lack of confidence to back themselves and to negotiate hard – but fairly. Not just for the money.

How do you master this?

To back yourself and negotiate a great outcome you need to do work both up front and during the job screening, interview and negotiation process.

Follow a structured and objective approach. If the call is out of the blue – take your time to revisit and refresh. Making an on the hoof decision is likely to generate a much poorer outcome. Not just for you, but for the hiring manager as well.

The up front work:

Map – Don’t jump.

Take your time. Map out your ideal role, what you bring to the table for that role, and how the role itself will add value to your career. Remember this is all preparatory planning which can be used now or later when you’re qualifying roles.

It’s not a good idea to just jump in.

The process of developing your baseline CV is an ideal time to reflect and work through your needs and value propositions – analysing and leveraging the achievements and the outcomes you’ve delivered. What you’ve enjoyed and what you’d rather leave behind or minimise in your next role. You should be able to come up with some ‘aha’ and ‘wow’ moments as well as some “yeah – I’d rather not” ones.

If you’re in the process of writing your CV you might like to revisit an article I wrote in October 2015; ‘Your CV: 7 front page rules to hook your audience’.

 

5 Key Steps:

It’s all about ‘knowing’.

  1. Knowing your skills, experience and the outcomes you’ve delivered
  2. Knowing your target audience
  3. Knowing their challenges
  4. Knowing what will resonate
    Resulting in…
  5. Knowing your value proposition – the value of you

Be confident in your ability to add value by knowing as much as you can – not just about them, but about yourself too.

If you’re enabled and/or prepared to distil down the essence of what it is that you bring to the table and the value derived by the employer, along with how that role maps into your own drivers, motivators and career aspirations, you can make a much better decision. And the decision of accepting or declining the opportunity should come much easier.

3 years ago I wrote an article about reducing the stress during your job search.

In the article I talk about the importance of understanding your needs and capabilities so you can ask powerful qualifying questions before proceeding with your application and downstream during the interview, qualification and negotiation phases.

The same still holds true today.

Click here to read this post.

Until you can fully grasp, understand and articulate your needs and capabilities  you’ll be wasting time and emotional energy by chasing non-aligned roles and invariably ending up not only selecting the wrong role but also negotiating poorly and in the long term being disappointed by the result.

So how can you structure this?

To help you stay on track you should define the key attributes of your next role by creating  a Role Attribute Template (RAT).  The RAT assists you to structure and ‘weight’ the key criteria reflecting your personal and career values, drivers, and motivators. These form important anchors during the decision process when sourcing and negotiating your next role – allowing you to populate the RAT with how that role will stack up.  It also enables you to ask the right questions during role research and qualification process.

To assist my clients in the decision making process I have developed an e-tool that provides structure and visual insights – allowing them to make objective decisions.

Importantly they are not only able to remain focused and on their career path, but they’re also able to back themselves – confident in that they’re making the right decision and negotiating a great outcome – which could be to walk away or to to say yes.

Don’t forget your current role…

If you’re currently in a role – think about how that role could be adapted. The grass is not always greener.

Right or Wrong Decision

 

So, if you’ve just received an offer – congratulations! Now’s the time to make a confident decision and back yourself either way.

Go for it!

About Craig:

Craig provides tailored Career Coaching, Curriculum Vitae (CV), LinkedIn Profiling and Outplacement services with a focus on developing his clients’ marketing collateral and interview skills to achieve the best possible outcome. His clients span from New Zealand, Australia, UAE and across to the UK, with his career advice articles read in over 130 countries.

He is recognised for his ability to develop his clients’ communication skills to enable them to sell their value proposition to employers and recruitment consultants, increasing their confidence and ability to back themselves, ultimately winning more employment opportunities and more importantly – selecting the right one.

Craig draws on over 20 years of leadership experience within various sectors including Recruitment, Professional Services, Financial Services, and Technology, supported by a strong background in sales and marketing.

Follow Craig McAlpine and MyCareerBrand.net:

Twitter: @MyCareerBrand #MyCareerBrand

Website: www.mycareerbrand.net

Facebook: www.facebook.com/MyCareerBrand.net

Blog: http://mycareerbrand.net/blog.html

LinkedIn:

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Applying For a Role, Career, jobs, Personal Brand

Connection Requests: Stop spamming your brand!

As LinkedIn drives membership activity with ‘suggested connections’ and one button clicks, we need to take control of our personal brand.

That means thinking about who we connect with and more importantly – how we go about connecting.

Transactional marketers and spammers are having a field day with LinkedIn’s connection requests and unsolicited selling. Don’t become one of them.

Any of you who have read my blogs or attended my seminars will know that I’m an advocate for the smart use of LinkedIn for personal brand, opportunity development and connecting with those you do know and those you don’t know yet. Opportunities often come from those people we don’t know yet – but who may know of us.

Connecting is easy. Doing it properly takes time – but is hugely rewarding.

So smart connecting is vital if you want to ramp up your career, job search, and protect and develop a strong personal brand.

If you send out spam-like non customised requests you run the risk of cannibalising all of the above.

If I was to use the below connection request I’d be demonstrating the lack of importance I place in the connection and above all – I’m lazy!

I don’t want to do either.

I’d also be wasting an opportunity to promote my brand.

If you send one of these to me – I might connect – or I might not.

If you’re lucky, I’ll send a LinkedIn message back to you asking why you want to connect – of course taking the time to reinforce my own brand.

Customise your request.

Research the recipient, view their profile, create a two way opportunity. Demonstrate a reason for the connection.

  • Invitations with email address: 2000 characters
  • Invitations without email address: 300 characters

At the very least please stop sending out the standard “I’d like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn.”

Example:

Hi Bilal

I came across your profile in my search for subject matter experts in the area of sustainability. I’m extremely interested in this area myself, and would appreciate the opportunity to connect with you and from time to time share ideas and opportunities.

Kind regards
Craig

 

Housekeeping:

Don’t waste the connection…

Say thanks!

Send a message thanking the person for their agreement to connect. This is an opportunity to reach out if you need to.

Managing your connections

Once you’ve connected, don’t let your connections fall into a dark hole. They’re a valuable asset. You may wish to use a similar approach to the one sales professionals use. LinkedIn has a basic CRM function.

You can Tag (categorise) your connections by assigning a tag to the connection in your connections list.

A = those I have worked directly with

B = those I know well

C = those I want to get to know

Or you can be more descriptive. I use descriptive text for my tags because I may want to search my connections later on.

You can use many different tags and apply more than one to each person for future reference.

Clearly you’ll adjust the tags as the nature of your relationship or their role changes.

Click here to learn more from LinkedIn about their tag function

In any event – please treat Connection Requests with the respect your brand deserves.

And then don’t forget about them. Keep in touch!

For more on this subject you may wish to refer to these articles:

Would You Connect With a Bag of Stones

Don’t Waste Connections

Follow Craig McAlpine:

Craig is a career coach who specialises in getting job seekers ready to go to market for a new opportunity. He provides coaching services to up-skill job seekers in Personal Branding, LinkedIn, CV’s, Job Interviews, Value Proposition and Communications.

Craig coaches clients around the world.

Website: www.mycareerbrand.net

Facebook: www.facebook.com/MyCareerBrand.net

Blog: http://mycareerbrand.net/blog.html

Twitter: @MyCareerBrand #MyCareerBrand

Connect with Craig on LinkedIn:

 

Tagged with: ,
Posted in LinkedIn, Personal Brand

Why and how recruiters can add real value.

During the talent acquisition process the Recruiter, Employer and Candidate experience can be a great one. This article lists 11 key areas that help to create a win : win : win.

Twice in the space of 2 days I’ve had some great feedback about recruiters – each from 2 different candidates, for 2 different recruiters from 2 different recruitment companies.

But then yesterday – I had the opposite. Oops!

So what’s the common theme?

The predominant feedback I get from candidates is that timely, honest and constructive communication really matters. A lack of communication from internal and external recruiters, irrelevant – and often misdirected responses, automated responses that are just plain transactional, or no response at all creates a bad impression. Just tell it the way it is.

Putting the coms part aside, the recruitment process itself is next on the list. If HR are doing their job, there’s really no excuse for a poor recruitment process and solid relationship management by any of the participants. And candidates, you’re included.

What’s causing the issue?

A raft of things. Clearly there’s the potential for disappointment on all sides. But over the last 20 years recruiters have seen their businesses eroded and their fees reduced by procurement managers, employers and online channels. Clearly there has to be an impact on the breadth and depth of recruitment and service delivery. Yet in most cases the expectation from employers and candidates around service delivery has remained the same.

Job searchers and employers have more options. On the flip side recruiters have more advanced technology and greater access to local and global talent. But job boards and e-mail have increased volume and reduced quality. The whole thing seems to be becoming more and more transactional.

So something had to give!

I’m certainly not arguing that change didn’t have to happen within the recruitment profession. And fees have to reflect the market. But at what cost? And what are the tradable’s and non tradable’s?

The reality is that the recruiters service offering has been diminished in some areas, and has had to transformationally change in others. Ownership of data, candidates and opportunities for candidates is no longer a value proposition.

Disintermediation

With the advent of career sites and other online talent acquisition channels such as job boards and LinkedIn recruiters saw their stranglehold on talent databases rapidly diminish, and with it – for some, their sole differentiator. Nobody ‘owns’ talent data anymore. Least of all recruiters. I remember in one recruitment agency’s case they claimed over 1000,000 registered candidates on their database. That claim to fame is no longer relevant and I hope deleted from their proposals.

And candidates have more power than ever before. They have access to more networking and online tools that assist them to find the right role with the right company – and they’re for the most part free. So employers need to make sure they don’t loose applicants along the way because of shoddy processes. Some ATS configurations actually do more harm than good – damaging the employer brand. So the employers are potentially cannibalising their own brand through poor use of technology and poor process. I saw that recently with a very senior candidate and a well known NZ cloud computing company.

We’ve become more transactional

A recruiters job can be like herding cats – not too dissimilar to this video – EDS ad. Have a look at it.  Sometimes those cats (read candidates and employers) are all soft and fluffy – and ‘just lovely’. Other times those cats have very sharp claws, they bite, have short memories, and are completely unpredictable. But is that just an excuse for poor performance, from any of the related parties? After-all – that’s a recruiters job.

How can we make it right?

Each participant in the recruitment process – Recruiter, Candidate and Employer must consider their role as symbiotic. Each must work together constructively – and look after each other. You don’t exist in isolation. And before you cast any blame, take the time to assess how you have contributed. Communication, transparency and honesty are in my view non tradable’s. Start working together and you’ve hit the trifecta.

So here’s my take on how the 3-way relationship of the Recruiter, the Candidate and the Employer should work.

Question: Can you spot the difference between the following participants?

A recruiter who adds value does these things:

  • They acknowledge communications, return calls and reply to e-mails (I’m not talking about the automated e-mail message!)
  • They meet candidates face to face – even if it’s just for a 15 minute chat.
  • They take the time to understand candidate requirements – drivers, motivators
  • They focus on the skills and experience – not just the last role
  • They recognise that the previous salary is only indicative and is totally related to the previous organisation
  • They don’t lie or embellish
  • They act with honesty and integrity
  • They share information in a timely manner
  • They know their market, challenges, salaries
  • They are prepared to say (and accept) “No” with good grace and provide constructive feedback
  • They follow up with the candidates and employers regularly post placement

Now – compare the above list with this one…

A candidate who adds value does these things:

  • They acknowledge communications, return calls and reply to e-mails (I’m not talking about the automated e-mail message – e.g. out of office!)
  • They meet recruiters face to face – even if it’s just for a 15 minute chat.
  • They take the time to understand the role requirements – drivers, motivators of the employer.
  • They focus on the skills and experience required for the new role – not just their last role.
  • They recognise that their previous salary is only indicative and is totally related to the previous organisation – over paid or under paid, or about right?
  • They don’t lie or embellish.
  • They act with honesty and integrity.
  • They share information in a timely manner.
  • They know their market, challenges, salaries.
  • They are prepared to say (and accept) “No” with good grace and provide constructive feedback.
  • They follow up with the recruiters regularly post placement

 

An employer who adds value does these things:

  • They acknowledge communications, return calls and reply to e-mails (I’m not talking about the automated e-mail message – e.g. out of office!)
  • They meet recruiters and candidates face to face – even if it’s just for a 15 minute chat.
  • They take the time to understand the candidates requirements – drivers, motivators and career path.
  • They focus on the skills and experience required for the new role – not just the last role of the candidate.
  • They recognise that their previous salary is only indicative and is totally related to the previous organisation – over paid or under paid, or about right?
  • They don’t lie or embellish.
  • They act with honesty and integrity.
  • They share information in a timely manner.
  • They know their business – market, challenges, salaries.
  • They are prepared to say (and accept) “No” with good grace and provide constructive feedback.
  • They follow up with the recruiters and appointments regularly post placement

So whats the difference?

Answer: There isn’t much of a difference at all!

So it’s your choice. As far as I can see, if everyone follows at least these basic rules, we all get on, and we have no reason to complain – just a recognition that we all need to work together effectively to be more successful. Each party needs to take ownership and responsibility for their end of the process.

To close…

Candidates; know that you will inevitably at some point be disappointed. There’s usually only one successful candidate for each role. You can learn from the experience or you can throw a tantrum and blame the recruiter and/or hiring manager.

Recruiters and employers; survey your candidates for process satisfaction regularly. Are you seeing a common theme? Don’t just wait for the 2016 SARA Recruiter Awards before you reach out! It’s a small town and word gets around.

Just to finish off… Some light hearted video content for you. Click here

 

Follow Craig McAlpine and MyCareerBrand.net:

Website: www.mycareerbrand.net

Facebook: www.facebook.com/MyCareerBrand.net

Blog: http://mycareerbrand.net/blog.html

Twitter: @MyCareerBrand #MyCareerBrand

Connect with Craig on LinkedIn:

About Craig @ MyCareerBrand.net:

Craig works with his career clients to build their Job Search Strategy through the development of:

  • Personal Brand
  • LinkedIn Profile
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Interview skills.

He also works with corporates and individuals who require assistance to build their Internal Brand, Outplacement/Career Transition, and to engineer inbound traffic for their sales teams.

He is recognised for his ability to develop his clients’ communication skills to enable them to sell their value proposition to managers for internal advancement, hiring managers and recruitment consultants, increasing their confidence, and positioning them to find and win career opportunities.

Craig draws on over 20 years of leadership experience within various sectors including Recruitment, Professional Services, Financial Services, and Technology, supported by a strong background in Sales and Marketing and General Management.

His clients span from New Zealand, Australia, UAE and across to the UK, and his career and job search strategy articles are read by many thousands of career mined individuals across more than 135 countries.

 

 

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Posted in Applying For a Role, Communications, Recruitment
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